June 26, 2007

Wednesday Hero - Staff Sgt. Darrell R. Griffin Jr. - US Army

This Week'ss Soldier Was Suggested By Jenn

Staff Sgt. Darrell R. Griffin Jr.
Staff Sgt. Darrell R. Griffin Jr.
36 years old from Alhambra, California
2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment,
3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division
March 21, 2007

"He was a really patriotic young man", said Darrell Griffin Sr. "He said that the people there really needed us and he felt it was the right place to be. He wished we didnt have to have wars, but since thats the way mankind is, he felt he was contributing an important part to his country".

SSgt. Griffin lost his life in Balad, Iraq when his unit came under fire as it was returning to base after conducting security operations in the Iraqi capital.

The eldest son of six children, SSgt. Griffin worked as an EMT before joining the California Army National Guard in 1999. He enlisted in the Army two years later, and in July 2001, was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, in Ft. Lewis, Washington. He served with that unit in Iraq from October 2004 to September 2005.

On his second tour of duty, SSgt. Griffin had been awarded the Bronze Star for valor in 2005 when he was credited with saving the lives of three U.S. and two Iraqi Army soldiers injured during battle in Tal Afar. He had also received the Army Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Non-Commissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, Combat Infantry Badge, Expert Infantry Badge, Parachute Badge, and the Meritorious Unit Citation.

"Griff was the type of man you want to have by your side in a fight," Maj. Brent Clemmer, his former company commander, wrote from Iraq. "He was the type of squad leader every young soldier wants to have".

"Darrell was my husband, my Soldier, my gift from God who was also the love of my life and always will be." Said his wife, Diana. "He was also 'a Soldier's Soldier of Strength and Honor' whose commitment to duty, honor and loyalty will be forever remembered by all who know and love him. The news of his death saddens us deeply and we ask for your prayers in our time of grief. Please also continue to keep our Soldiers in your prayers

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. To find out more about Wednesday Hero, you can go here.

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June 25, 2007

Henry leaves Gunners for Barca

So sorry to see you go.

SPAIN SOCCER BARCELONA THIERRY HENRY
Sin recores.

Suerte, Henry!

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June 20, 2007

Wednesday Hero - Lance Cpl. Hatak Yuka Keyu M. Yearby - USMC

Lance Cpl. Hatak Yuka Keyu M. Yearby
Lance Cpl. Hatak Yuka Keyu M. Yearby
21 years old from Overbrook, Oklahoma
3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force
May 14, 2006

Hatak Yuka Keyu Martin Yearby was remembered in funeral services as a small town boy who balanced his Choctaw tribal heritage and his military life.

He did traditional American Indian dances with grace, compassion, discipline and free spirit "the way he lived his life," the Rev. Timm Emmons said Monday.

"He had a desire to be in the military since he was a young boy. And he believed in what he was doing. He was a warrior, and he was a hero and he finished the course."

Yearby was killed by a roadside bomb, along with fellow Lance Cpl. Jose S. MarinDominguez Jr., in the Al Anbar province of Iraq, two months after he arrived in that country.

Friends and family, fellow American Indians, teachers and classmates filed past his open casket for an hour after the funeral while a U.S. Marine Corps honor guard stood at attention.

About 1,000 people attended a funeral service meant to celebrate the life of the 21-year-old newlywed from Overbrook in southern Oklahomas Love County.

Those who spoke in the packed Marietta High School auditorium talked of how he loved to hunt, but never came back with anything. He played tricks, won dancing awards at powwows and appeared on a recruiting magazine for Upward Bound because of a headdress he made from a T-shirt.

Nine of his friends stood on stage to remember Yearby. Jake Barber spoke for them, pausing several times to regain his composure.

"Many great words describe Hatak. The only real word you need to say is 'brother'. He will always be known to us as the ace of spades, the most important card in the deck. He touched us so dearly that words cannot explain,".

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. To find out more about Wednesday Hero, you can go here.

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June 19, 2007

9 Firefighters give their lives in South Carolina Warehouse Fire

This combination of photos provided Tuesday, June 19, 2007 by the City of Charleston, S.C. shows the nine firefighters killed in a fire Monday night in Charleston. Top row, left to right: Bradford "Brad" Baity, 37, Capt. Mike Benke, 49, Melvin Champaign, 46. Middle row, left to right: James "Earl" Drayton, 56, Michael French, 27, Capt. William "Billy" Hutchinson, 48. Bottom row, left to right: Mark Kelsey, 40, Capt. Louis Mulkey, 34, Brandon Thompson, 27.

(AP Photo/City of Charleston)
"This is a profession that we must never take for granted," the mayor said.
"There's a fire raging and they go toward it."


Thank you Lord, for blessing us with such courageous men.

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June 12, 2007

Wednesday Hero - Bert Brady - American Citizen

This Week's Hero Was Suggested By Malinda

69-year-old Bert Brady has never stepped foot in Iraq or Afghanistan, yet many soldiers who have know who he is and appreciate what he's done for them. You see, for the past year Mr. Brady has made a trip to the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport nearly every morning to welcome home returning American troops. Bert Brady, along with fellow veterans, is a member of the Welcome Home a Hero program. They make sure that every soldier who steps off a plane in Dallas gets a special homecoming.

Brady shows up each day with the goal of making soldiers feel appreciated and proud of their service. He's often joined by veterans of the Vietnam and Korean wars who did not get a warm reception when they returned from battle.

"We are not going to forget them like a lot of Vietnam soldiers have been forgotten," Brady said. "We are not going to forget the soldiers of today."

To read more about Bert Brady, you can go to ABCnews.com

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.
We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. To find out more about Wednesday Hero, you can go here.

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June 09, 2007

Albania Hearts America

Whodathunk?

SOFIA, Bulgaria - Bulgaria has lost 13 soldiers in Iraq, but says it is committed to the U.S.-led coalition at least until next spring, and Albania professes such an affinity for America that it has issued three stamps featuring President Bush's picture and the Statue of Liberty.
Three stamps!

And what do we do? We issue commemorative Elvis stamps and the always popular Forever stamp.

But Bush is so well-liked in Albania, the street running in front of parliament has been renamed in his honor.

"Albanians identify the United States of America as the cradle of liberty and democracy," said Albert Rakipi of the Albanian Institute for International Studies. Bush's visit to the mostly Muslim nation is "a thank you for Albania's nonstop support of U.S. policy," he said.

Well ain't that somethin'?

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June 08, 2007

Why so many Republicans had been willing to sell out America

The Inside Story Of How The Senate Immigration Bill Died

[W]hy [sic] so many Republicans had been supporting such an incredibly unpopular bill:

First off, there was what he referred to as the "Rovian School of thought," which says that passing this bill would capture the Hispanic vote for the GOP for decades to come.

Next up, there's the "Chamber of Commerce" vote. He says these Republicans were heavily influenced by business groups that want cheap labor no matter what the cost is for the rest of the country.

Then there was the last group, the smallest group in his opinion, who were willing to sign onto a terrible bill just so they could say they were part of a big reform that had bipartisan support.

Anyone who tries to piss on the value of American citizenship by supporting this bill, Republican or Democrat, needs to seriously re-examine what this country means to them.

(Hey, if the POTUS can question whether I truly want what's best for this country, I can redirect the question, too.)

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June 06, 2007

Wednesday's Heroes - Col. David Sutherland & brigade Chaplain Maj. Charlie Fenton - US Army

This Week's Soldiers Were Suggested By Mary Ann

Col. David Sutherland
Col. David Sutherland(Left)
45 Years Old From Toledo, Ohio
Commander, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division
Since being deployed to the Diyala province of Iraq in November 2006, Col. David Sutherland, along with brigade Chaplain Maj. Charlie Fenton, pictured on the right, has made it a point to visit every wounded soldier and say goodbye to each and everyone of his men who've lost their life. Four of his soldiers died on one day in April 2007 and the bad news arrived at his office in waves -- a knock on the door, a note handed in by an aide, heads bowed, knowing glances exchanged. Aides say Sutherland walks to the mortuary affairs tent at his base and embraces the dead bodies of his men. "I hug all my fallen soldiers", said Sutherland. "They are my own".

Diyala province is one of the worst places in Iraq. Public beheadings of Iraqi police, tribal wars, sectarian wars and al-Qaida. "I didn't come here thinking it'd be easy. No one told me, 'You're gonna get 9 hours of sleep a night and you're not gonna lose soldiers'. But I believe this is the place for me."

"As a soldier, I want to be here on the ground," he said. "As an American, I want it to end."

For more information about Col. Sutherland, visit this page.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. To find out more about Wednesday Hero, you can go here.

Posted by Kyer at 08:24 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 05, 2007

Mass Holocaust grave unearthed in Ukraine

Mass Holocaust grave unearthed in Ukraine

KIEV, Ukraine - A mass grave holding the remains of thousands of Jews killed by the Nazis has been found in southern Ukraine near the site of what was once a concentration camp, a Jewish community representative said Tuesday.

The grave was found by chance last month when workers were preparing to lay gas pipelines in the village of Gvozdavka-1, near Odessa, said Roman Shvartsman, a spokesman for the regional Jewish community.

The Nazis established two ghettos during World War II near the village and brought Jews there from what is now Moldova as well as Ukrainian regions, Shvartsman said. In November 1941, they set up a concentration camp and killed about 5,000 Jews, he said.

Just awful. Simply awful.

More than 50 years later, we're still uncovering the victims of a mad man's evil dream.

(Blame this evidence on Western propaganda, all you Holocaust denying bastards)

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June 01, 2007

10th Mountain Div. at Fort Drum NY: Monthly mass funerals

Thanks to Bluto at the Jawa Report for this story:

A somewhat surprising announcement from Fort Drum.

Army officials there say they'll begin hosting monthly memorial services for 10th mountain division soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Previously, Fort Drum had held individual ceremonies for each of its soldiers killed in action.

A spokesman for the military post says the change is due to scheduling, not an increase in combat deaths.

Fort Drum has lost roughly 140 soldiers since 2003.

This is not right at all. I can't imagine what's going on in regards to "scheduling" that each fallen soldier cannot be given the due individual honors he deserves.

I can't imagine what it would be like for the familes to mourn collectively. Something about this just doesn't sit well with me.

And what's with this "lost roughly 140 soldiers" talk? Is there not an exact number available ?

Posted by Kyer at 10:54 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack
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